Wednesday’s lecture led to the mini-task brief of creating a cover for 1 of 4 different magazines. The options we had were spread across the board, and the first two really stood out to me. These were to create a cover for Empire Magazine based on Quentin Tarantino’s career, and to create a cover for TimeOut TimeIn Magazine which celebrated Hallow’s Eve. Both of these options really stood out to me and I was excited to design one of them, (eventually I gave in and designed both because I wanted to). With the Empire Magazine cover, I wanted to try and create a minimalist approach so it got people thinking about the design. To do this, I decided that picking a character from a Tarantino movie would be a great way to do this. So, with that in mind I decided to go with Uma Thurman’s iconic character of ‘The Bride’ and her iconic yellow jumpsuit. I wanted to strip her character down to the bare minimum so that it was a minimalist as possible yet still recognisable. I did this by adding the black detailing of the suit using Adobe Illustrator. I used the colour scheme of Red & Yellow because that seems to be a big hit with a few of Tarantino’s movies. The typography I used was a combination pairing of a more mature typeface accompanied by a more slashed feel typeface, something which I thought was typically Tarantino-esque. As you can see, I also added a samurai sword at the top of the page to separate the words ‘limited’ and ‘edition’ and just to add that extra reference.

My Cover Designs for Empire & TimeOut TimeIn Magazine.
My Cover Designs for Empire & TimeOut TimeIn Magazine.

Personally speaking, I don’t really read magazines. I have no recollection of many magazine distributors, however, I am sure that for my next module at University and that its based around editorial design, I will learn a great deal more. Having done some research of my own, one editorial magazine that caught my eye (excuse the pun) were these Eye magazine covers. Each and every cover is associated with a different issue, all of which are incredibly but beautifully different. They are so simple in design, there is no issue number, no title yet from the visual language, the typography and the colour considerations, you can tell that they are all different issues, all based on a different topic. Everything from colour scheme to typography to imagery, all are completely different, yet they scream Eye Magazine to me, even though I had no idea that this magazine existed until now (slightly embarrassing as it is a graphic design magazine oops). The visual language in itself is exquisite. The logo creates a constant graphic language, something which Eye magazine have clearly and quite cleverly rendered their own. I believe that they work so well because they are so visually pleasing. They don’t follow a specific grid layout and that’s whats so interesting about them. The covers to me feel like you are entering the mind of someone else, or in this case the cover designers mind. They way that the type and imagery are displayed is like the designer has jut thrown his ideas out there, like a type of expressionism. You can tell just by looking at these that the designer/s had fun making them. This reflects in the narrative of the magazine, and what is greatly important for like-minded creatives who buy this magazine. I can’t even begin to choose my favourite design. That’s how you know that the designs on these are simply breath-taking, and I think you can agree with me on that.

My views on Good vs Bad Editorial Magazine Design.
My views on Good vs Bad Editorial Magazine Design.
Jack Denton

Jack Denton

Multi-Media Creative & BCU Graphics Student from Birmingham